No-Sew Cornice

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April 14, 2015 by bridgitgillis

Hide the top of those ugly blinds cheap and easy without using a sewing machine!

cornice5

The blinds covering my sliding glass doors have been screaming for a personal touch.  As usual, I wanted something cheap, easy, and pleasing to the eye.  I managed to complete this in about 2 hours, and it makes the room a lot nicer.

Supplies needed:

Tape measure
Sharpie marker
Large piece of foam board approx. 2 inches thick (the longer the better- I had a spare sheet of foam insulation)
Box cutter/foam cutting knife
Push pins/fabric pins (see picture below)
Duct tape
Fabric (I used 1 yard for this and barely had enough)
Hot glue gun
Hammer

Directions:

1. Measure the width of the door/window opening from the outsides of your trim.  Add the width of your foam to each side.  This is the length of foam you will need.
2. Decide how tall you want your cornice to be.
3.  Measure out these dimensions using your tape measure, sharpie, and straight edge.  Cut your foam.  (This can get messy- I suggest cutting it in a garage or outdoors)
-If your foam board isn’t long enough, as mine was, piece it together and attach using duct tape.  Wrap the tape around several times to build support.

cornice1

4. Measure the depth you would like your cornice and subtract the width of the foam board.  Cut a foam piece out for each side, then attach them to the cornice front with fabric staples.  (see picture below)  I chose to double the foam for added support on the side.  This also helped in attaching the staples.  It held surprisingly well, even after flopping it around attaching fabric.

Be sure to measure your crease if you are overlapping fabric.

Be sure to measure your crease if you are overlapping fabric.

5. Hold your foam cornice up to the space to make sure it is the correct size.
6. Begin to attach your fabric to the foam using straight pins and staples every so often for support.  These straight pins are very short.  Point your straight pins towards the outside of the cornice so that the fabric won’t pull the pin out.  The back can be uncovered, like the picture above, or fully covered.  To fully cover it simply overlap the edges and pin.
7. Be sure to cover all sides of the cornice supports, as they will be visible.  You may need to piece the material together and use multiple pins.
8. If you need to use two strips of fabric (or more) make the overlap in a symmetrical location.  Fold the edge of your material over at least a quarter inch, and iron in place.  Line up your pattern and continue pinning.
9. If your cornice will be long like mine, you might want to attach a support in the middle as well.  Mine was attached directly to the plastic of the blind frame, so I measured the size and attached it to the middle of the cornice with staples.  All four sides of this will need to be covered as well.  (leave the ends that will connect to the cornice and the wall bare)
10. Once your fabric is attached, decide how you would like to attach the cornice to the wall.  I had some simple picture hanging supplies already, so I hot glued a circular hook onto each end support.  It was then hung on a picture hook nailed into the wall. (see picture below)

The middle support attached to the frame for the blinds.  I used a command strip to attach the foam to the blind.  Rubber cement could also be used.

The middle support attached to the frame for the blinds. I used a command strip to attach the foam to the blind. Rubber cement could also be used.

Close up of the cornice and the hardware that it was attached to the wall with.

Close up of the cornice and the hardware that it was attached to the wall with.

Hanging the cornice was quite the experience simply because of how long it was.  Since the foam makes it super light, the picture hanging nail and hook is enough t keep it secure.  Mine has been hanging for a while now and I have never had a issue with it coming off or falling down.

cornice520150321_193226

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